Archive for the ‘Tips & Tricks’ Category


Testing Plugins on CFWheels 2.x and Travis CI via commandbox

One of the nicest things about CFWheels 2.x is the tighter integration with command-line tools such as Commandbox. We can take advantage of the new testing suite JSON return type and the new CFWheels CLI in Commandbox 2.x to easily build a Travis CI test. It’s perhaps easiest to just show the .travis.yml file – this goes in the root of your gitHub plugin repository, and once you’ve turned on testing under Travis.org, will run your test suite on every commit.

In sum, this:

  1. Installs Commandbox
  2. Installs the CFWheels CLI
  3. Installs the master branch of the CFWheels repository
  4. Installs your plugin from your repository (rather than the forgebox version which will be the version behind)
  5. Starts the local server
  6. Runs the test suite, pointing only at your plugin’s unit tests

Naturally, you could do more complex things with this, such as multiple CF Engines, and maybe even multiple CFWheels versions, but for a quick setup it’s a good starting point!

Unit Testing your new 2.x app in 2.x beta

Hands up if you’ve ever found a bug in your application..

Upgrades, feature enhancements and bug fixes are all part of the development lifecycle, but quite often with deadlines, it’s difficult to manually test the entire functionality of your application with every change you make. What if there were an automated way of checking if that change you’re making is going to break something?

Enter the CFWheels test framework!

In the past, writing an automated test suite against your application meant downloading, configuring and learning a completely separate framework. To help address this issue, CFWheels includes a small, simple, yet powerful testing framework. Whilst this has been part of the core in 1.x, it’s never been properly documented, and with 2.x, we’ve introduced lots of new features to help test your application.

Here is a simple example of unit testing a helper function that adds two numbers.

The same idea can be applied to just about any function in your application. Here are some of the things you might want to test:

  • Global helper functions return the values expected
  • That custom model validations return error messages when a value is not valid
  • Model callbacks are fired and produce the expected result
  • Controllers produce the expected output
  • Controllers redirect to the correct location

Once you have a comprehensive test suite, you can make code changes with a greater sense of confidence that you have not introduced bugs (regressions) into your application. This gives you the opportunity to implement automated test runners into a continuous integration platform like Jenkins or TravisCI.

Don’t just take our word for it.. well actually, DO take our word for it as CFWheels 2.0 has been developed exclusively against the inbuilt test framework.

For those of you who have been using the testing framework in your CFWheels 1.x applications, the 2.0 framework has a number of improvements around setup, teardown and a super handy processRequest function:

You get lots of handy information back, like the body contents, the status code of the request, and more.

Want to get going? Check the comprehensive tutorial at guides.cfwheels.org

Calling all plugin authors! Time for 2.x…

With CFWheels 2.0 beta around the corner, it’s time to have a cold hard look at the CFWheels plugin ecosystem.

With 2.x, we’ve taken the opportunity to modernise how we deal with plugins. If you’re a plugin author who has previously released something for 1.x, you’ll be pleased to hear there aren’t that many changes required to get your plugins playing nicely with 2.x, but it’s definitely a good time to revisit what you’ve got out there.

Introducing Forgebox.io

One of the main problems we had previously was a lack of a centralised repository of CFwheels plugins. The old system relied on a bit too much manual updating, and over time got a little long in the tooth. So now, all plugins should be added to forgebox.io, specifically in the CFWheels Plugins category. If you go and have a look now, you’ll see a few added by the core team as examples. Adding your plugin shouldn’t be too much hard work, but it’s definitely worth setting yourself up properly to publish to forgebox automatically via the commandline. There’s an extensive tutorial over at guides.cfwheels.org which we recommend you follow. In short, you ideally need a properly configured box.json file and for your plugins to use git tagged releases (ideally). If you’ve not installed commandbox and the CFWheels CLI, now is definitely the time to try it!

Easier for other developers too

Once your plugin is in the forgebox system, other CFWheels users can install your plugin with a single CLI command: install slugName; If they’ve got the CFWheels CLI installed, it will automatically create appropriate .zip files with the correct version number (which you’ll have set in box.json) too. They’ll also be able to view all existing plugins with wheels plugins list  making it extra quick to find the plugin they need. Dependencies are then tracked in that user’s box.json file, so they can even distribute an app without your plugin, and then simply run install to go and download the correct version later: they can even update to the latest version of your plugin via the CLI too, or freeze it to a specific version.

Automatic Java Mappings

One of the nice new features of 2.x is the automatic java library mappings which plugins can now take advantage of. Previously, you had to rely on the developer to manually add an entry into this.javaSettings.loadpaths if your plugin required use of a .class or .jar file. Now, we scan the plugin folders on startup, and automatically add any folders which contain .jar or .class files. One less step for configuration! You can see an example of this in the CFWheels bCrypt plugin, which adds a quick wrapper around the bCrypt java class.

Don’t forget your comments!

In a previous post, we talked about the new embedded documentation: plugins can now take advantage of this. For plugin authors, we’re recommending you comment all public functions – here’s a quasi code example below.

The important part is the [section: Plugins] and [category: Plugin Name] part, which will automatically sort your functions in the correct place in the internal documentation. It’s a good habit to get into, and will help other users of your plugin too.

Oh, and unit tests 🙂

Don’t forget to write some unit tests too (hey, don’t we all do TDD?); there’s been some changes to the test suite in 2.x, and writing unit tests is loads easier. More to follow on:

  • New functions for testing in 2.x
  • Running plugin tests via command line,
  • How to add your plugin to Travis CI for continuous integration testing